New article collection launch: Religion and Poverty (Palgrave Macmillan)

Palgrave Communications the open access journal from Palgrave Macmillan (part of Springer Nature), which publishes research across the humanities and social sciences, is pleased to announce the launch of a new research article collection (‘special issue’) on Religion and Poverty.

Editors: Dr Gottfried Schweiger and Dr Helmut P Gaisbauer (Centre for Ethic and Poverty Research, University of Salzburg, Austria); Prof Clemens Sedmak (Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King's College London, UK/Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research, University of Salzburg, Austria).

Poverty and religion are interrelated in different ways. On the one hand, for various religious traditions poverty is both an aspect of a particular faithful life (e.g. monastic communities) and giving to the poor is seen as a religious duty. Such traditions have evolved over time and expanded the role of faith-based organisations nowadays play in welfare provision and international development. Faith-based organizations play an important role in poverty alleviation both in rich and poor countries. These actions and practices, as well as their religious and theological underpinnings, deserve scrutiny. On the other hand, religion plays an important role in the life of people living in poverty: how they experience and shape their living, and how they find their place in society and the communities in which they. The role of religion in justifying certain inequalities and processes of exclusion (e.g. in India) and thus contributing to the sustainability of poverty is another important theme worth reflection.

This is a rolling article collection and as such submissions/proposals will be welcome throughout 2018. If you are interested in contributing please see the call for papers: https://www.nature.com/palcomms/for-authors/call-for-papers#religion-poverty

This special issue is run in collaboration with the 2017 Salzburg Conference on Interdisciplinary Poverty Research, organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research of the University of Salzburg.