CALL FOR PRESENTERS: 2021 INTERNATIONAL SIMULATION THEORY eCONFERENCE

CALL FOR PRESENTERS: 2021 INTERNATIONAL SIMULATION THEORY eCONFERENCE DATES: March 20–21, 2021 The Global Center for Religious Research (GCRR) is hosting the 2021 International Simulation Theory eConference, which will bring together scholars, specialists, and philosophers from all over the world to discuss the different problems, proofs, and solutions in current simulation theory. The purpose of this multidisciplinary virtual conference is to advance the scientific and philosophical understanding of how the simulation hypothesis may or may not answer important cosmological, metaphysical, and even theological questions plaguing humanity.

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Holy Waters: An Interdisciplinary Examination of Religion and Alcohol

With an increase in academic programs related to viniculture and brewing science, the time is ripe for contributions from the humanities and social sciences. We believe the theories and methods of religious studies have important contributions to offer studies of alcohol. Thus, we seek to bring together scholars from across disciplines to examine the historical, social, ritual, economic, political and cultural relationship between religion and alcohol across time periods and around the world. The goal of the workshop is to create an edited volume with broad appeal that will advance research on religion and alcohol. Submissions: To submit a proposal for consideration, please email an abstract of approximately 250 words and a brief C.V. (2 pages) to ryan.r.lemasters@wmich.edu. The title of your abstract should be your last name and be sent as a PDF. The subject line of the email should appear as follows “Holy Waters.” The deadline to submit is October 1, 2021. Those selected for inclusion will be notified by the organizing committee by October 11, 2021.

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Religious Trauma (2nd Annual International eConference)

CALL for PRESENTERS! The Global Center for Religious Research (GCRR) is hosting the 2nd Annual International eConference on Religious Trauma, which will bring together specialists, psychiatrists, and researchers from all over the world to discuss the causes of religious trauma, as well as its manifestations and treatment options for those afflicted with the often adverse and disruptive effects associated with religion. The purpose of this multidisciplinary virtual conference is to advance the clinical and psychological understanding of religious trauma. This two-day conference will provide an interdisciplinary platform for scholars, educators, and practitioners to present their research to international audiences from all different backgrounds. And because the virtual conference is held online, scholars and students can attend from the comfort and safety of their own home without having to worry about travel and lodging expenses. PRESENTERS WANTED! We encourage the following people to submit an abstract proposal (200-500 words) to present at this year’s international academic conference: ~Psychologists / Psychiatrists ~Counselors / Therapists ~Religious Trauma Survivors ~Social-Scientists ~Historians ~Philosophers ~Researchers ~Professors ~Authors ~Theologians ~Graduate Students ~Other Specialists in this Field of Study Upon passing peer-review and acceptance by the Conference Committee, all academic research presentations will be published in an upcoming issue of the peer-reviewed academic journal, Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry (SHERM). Presenters can also feature and promote their own publications during the conference for free! Abstract Proposal Deadline: March 1st, 2022 For more information, visit: https://www.gcrr.org/religioustraumaconference2022

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Call for Papers for Sociology Compass Special Issue - Catholic Youth: Highly Religious Young Catholics in Society

The editor/s invite contributions to this special issue that engage with the following questions. Articles with an international comparative approach are especially welcome: Who are these highly religious young Catholics? How can they be characterized in terms of religiosity and in terms of a range of social issues (life choices, participation in society, relationship with others, etc.)? If there are differences between countries, which differences exist? How do they differentiate from their parents, relatives, and friends, from the other young Catholics, and from the whole youth? Are there really differentiating features? Are they young people like the others? What is the relation between religious identity and overall post-modern values and high pluralization? How do these young people interact with our modernity and its values? Do they look at modernity differently? Do they see it as a threat or an opportunity? How these young Catholics became so highly religious? What is the very nature of religious socialization that can explain this? Did they convert? May their life histories explain the nuances of their path towards high religiosity? What is their role in Catholic Church’s evangelization? Are they fundamental for the Catholic Church? What is their involvement in parishes organization and in ecclesial movements? Do they have a different involvement in civil society?

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